Wilman Villar’s Death and Questions for the Cuban Press

For those of you who can read me from Cuba, many of whom are employees of the media, I suggest you ask yourself some questions:Wilman Villar’s hunger strike was followed by some of the international news media routinely monitored in Cuba, even before Wilman became critical and was transferred to the hospital. Orlando Zapata died two years ago in very similar circumstances, which sparked what is known as “a new media campaign against Cuba.”

Wilman Villar’s hunger strike was followed by some of the international news media routinely monitored in Cuba, even before Wilman’s condition became critical and he was transferred to the hospital. Orlando Zapata died two years ago in very similar circumstances, which sparked what is known as “a new media campaign against Cuba.For those of you who can read me from Cuba, many of whom are employees of the media, I suggest you ask yourself some questions:

  • Why was he not transferred to the hospital when his condition became critical?
  • How do you explain, given the above history, the failure of the penal authorities in this case?
  • How is it that among the information published, there is no mention of an investigation of the events in the prison?

The national press has published a press release, an editorial and one of Fidel’s “Reflections” in which he denies that Villar was a regime of the regime and that he was on hunger strike in prison.

  • Why was he punished for assault, disrespect and resistance, and not for bodily injury if, as has been said, he savagely beat his wife?
  • Why did you omit Villar’s age and health status upon entering prison just a month earlier?
  • What were the prison conditions under which the defendant acquired a fatal respiratory disease?
  • Why is he denied status as a member of the opposition status if there is documentation of his participation in peaceful protests?

The government has called on the press to set aside its stiffness and engage in dynamic journalism that sticks to reality.

  • Why did no journalist have the instinct to cover this far-reaching story?
  • If the instinct was there, did you expect some permission from his superiors? From the Bureau of Prisons within the Ministry of the Interior (MINIT)? Did you do nothing because he was denied permission?
  • If you have not lost your instinct, are you satisfied with the focus of the news?

Sad office, that of the press in Cuba.

January 30 2012

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